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treatable anxiety disorders

Below is a summary of some anxiety disorders that Vicki can provide treatment for. She will provide you with an intervention plan, ultimately allowing you manage and overcome you anxiety independently. She can also advise on alternative options if  this course of treatment is not appropriate for you.



Anxiety disorders

panic attacks

General anxiety disorder

Panic disorder

Emotions trigger a physiological reaction such as sweating if anxious or racing heart if agitated or presented with a stressful situation. These symptoms are thought to be evolutionary for survival purposes whereby the autonomic nervous system (ANS) sends signals to other organs muscles and glands. When you're anxious, you may also have a range of physical symptoms.

Panic disorder

General anxiety disorder

Panic disorder

 Panic disorder may be more complex than the panic attacks instigated by specific phobias as the panic and anxiety levels can be triggered for no conscious or apparent reason. This often leads to avoidance of certain places where there may be crowds or even open areas can evoke panic. This can eventually lead to a further anxiety disorder such as agoraphobia (fear of being in a situation or place where one may have a panic attack).  

General anxiety disorder

General anxiety disorder

General anxiety disorder

 Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most prevalent anxiety disorders with research suggesting there are up to two million sufferers in the UK. Although many people initially try to normalize their problem by referring to themselves as being a 'worrier' or are often described as 'only happy when they have something to worry about', the disorder is in fact chronic and often accompanies other disorders such as depression, social anxiety disorder, irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia and alcohol abuse. 

depersonalisation

obsessive compulsive disorder

General anxiety disorder

 Depersonalisation is a personal feeling of unreality, a subjective feeling of being disassociated from the world. Often described as a feeling of being spaced or feeling in a dreamlike state, even time can appear to slow down and movement of events appear in slow motion.  However, during the experience, one's testing of reality represents normality as it is not a psychotic occurrence. Yet despite this awareness, depersonalisation can be a frightening and extremely distressing experience as the sufferer often believes the feeling will be eternal or he/she is going insane. 
 

obsessive compulsive disorder

obsessive compulsive disorder

obsessive compulsive disorder

 Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterised by constant obsessions and compulsions that cause significant distress to the person and often interferes with daily functioning. The person with OCD feels compelled to carry out behavioural or mental rituals in order to avoid an irrational feared outcome or reduce levels of anxiety. 

social anxiety disorder

obsessive compulsive disorder

obsessive compulsive disorder

 Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a fear of social situations including meeting new people, attending social functions, delivering a speech, using public toilets, dealing with people in authority, eating in a restaurant and disagreeing with or challenging others.

Research has shown that some people with social anxiety have high levels of perfectionism regarding how they are viewed in public and similarly how they assess the behaviour of others. They fear greatly that others notice their symptoms of social anxiety such as blushing, shaking or sweating.  

Depression

Depression

Depression

  

Feeling down from time to time is a normal part of life, but when emotions such as hopelessness and despair take hold and just won’t go away, you may have depression. More than just sadness in response to life’s struggles and setbacks, depression changes how you think, feel, and function in daily activities. It can interfere with your ability to work, study, eat, sleep, and enjoy life. Just trying to get through the day can be overwhelming.


Left untreated it can become a serious health condition. But it’s important to remember that feelings of helplessness and hopelessness are symptoms of depression—not the reality of your situation.

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